Archive by Author | jwilliams114

J.Lo’s Fiat Fiasco

By Alison Parker

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

J.Lo’s new commercial for Fiat automobiles features her driving around the Bronx, her hometown, in a white Fiat 500. There has been a bit of controversy surrounding the commercial because it turns out that the Bronx scenes were shot using a body double and the scenes with J.Lo were shot in Los Angeles. This filming tactic seemed a bit ironic because the theme of the commercial is that the Bronx is her “world” and she lists all the reasons this place “inspires” her.

But that wasn’t the only controversy surrounding the video. Graffiti artist group Tats Cru sued Fiat for the unauthorized use of their “I [heart] Bronx” mural which appears in the video. Fiat quickly settled the dispute with the group for an undisclosed amount.

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Creating the Pay-Per-Mile High Club

By Gabriella Ripoll

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

Can airplanes become bastions of airporn?  Sexual speech, even speech short of obscenity, has not been held particularly dear by the Supreme Court in their First Amendment jurisprudence, with zoning regulations as to pornographic theaters and laws banning nude dancing both being held to be within Constitutional rights. E.g. Renton v. Playtime Theatres, Inc., 475 U.S. 41 (1986); Erie v. Pap’s A.M., 529 U.S. 277 (2000). So what legislation might airlines expect in response to the development of in-flight pornography on demand for fliers? Austin Considine, “Pornography on Airplanes, Where You Can’t Look Away,” NYTimes, Nov. 18 2011, http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/20/fashion/pornography-on-airplanes-where-you-cant-look-away.html?_r=1&ref=fashion

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Tootsie Roll v. Footzyrolls

By Maria Cheung

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

The Chicago based candy giant Tootsie Roll Industries (“Tootsie”) is suing Rollashoe, a small footwear company that makes rollable ballet slippers, for trademark infringement. According to the lawsuit filed in federal court in Illinois, Rollashoe whose shoes are marketed under the name Footzyrolls, is infringing on the brand name of Tootsie Roll.

 

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When Opinions Can Get You In Trouble

By Alison Parker 

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

I studied journalism in college and if I learned anything, it was that as journalists, we hold ourselves out to be the fourth branch of government; it is our duty to objectively report the state of affairs in an informed and unbiased manner. Sure, a lot of news out there today may appear to be a bit liberal or a bit conservative, and some sources are definitely sensational at times. But despite attempts to sell papers, or in this day and age, to get clicks, the journalistic oath remains in tact. There are certain jobs where giving your two bits is acceptable, but being a journalist certainly isn’t one of them.

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Selena Gomez’s Crazy Stalker Drama

By Alison Parker 

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

Selena Gomez was denied a permanent restraining order in court–but not because her stalker wasn’t deemed threatening enough, but because he failed to appear in court. Although 36-year-old alleged stalker Thomas Bronicki has been released from jail, he currently resides at a psychiatric ward in an unnamed hospital in Los Angeles. The judge did, however, extend Ms. Gomez’s temporary restraining order so that she could have some protection in the meantime until the next hearing, which is scheduled for January 6. If Mr. Bronicki appears for that hearing, the judge will then determine whether a permanent restraining order, which can last for 1-3 years subject to renewal, is warranted.

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Casey Anthony’s Prosecutor Tells All

 

By Alison Parker 

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

The Casey Anthony trial was a media frenzy and has continued to be a subject of fascination even after the delivery of the verdict. One of prosecutors at Anthony’s trial, Jeff Ashton, recently published a book about the trial, called Imperfect Justice: Prosecuting Casey Anthony. The book discusses certain evidence that did not get into court, Casey’s different versions of what happened to her daughter, and even goes as far as to call the defense team “liars.” In an Orlando Sentinel article, Ashton told reporters that he thought that “most attorneys would find many of the things [he talked about] in the book to be ethically objectionable” and suggested that it may be subject to ethics probes in the future. While I haven’t read the book, this statement got me curious. Why would an attorney knowingly do something that he felt would subject him to an ethics probe?

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Who will get to say “YUP” in music and TV?— The legal battle over a simple utterance

By Kelli Coughlin 

Reviewed by Jennifer Williams

We’ve all become accustomed to various catchphrases that have become increasingly used and recognized in our popular culture.  But never before has this blogger recognized the word “YUP” as one of these so called catchphrases.

Last week, rapper and hip hop artist Trey Songz was sued by Dave Hester, who is the star of the reality series “Storage Wars” on A&E.  But this lawsuit is the just the intermediary between these two entertainers who are battling for use of the word.  Trey Songz had previously sent a cease and desist letter to Hester that demanded the reality star to immediately refrain from using the phrase “YUP” in his television show, in addition to abstaining from selling merchandise that depicts the word.

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